From an episode of The Rap

Interview

‘It’s Time to Mobilise.’ Standing Up for Indigenous Victorians on The Rap

Tommy Lovett was wrongfully arrested by police in 2016. During the arrest the 18-year-old suffered ‘deep bruising, cuts over his body, swelling and abrasions on his forehead and prominent welts surrounding his eyes and cheeks’ (The Age). The teen was then charged with resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer – charges that hung over him for a year before being dropped. When his mother made a formal complaint regarding the arrest, Vic Police admitted no fault.

According to Wayne Muir, CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service, this kind of story isn’t new. Joining Daniel James (filling in for Areej) on The Rap Wayne explains why less than 1.5 per cent of complaints against police by Aboriginal Victorians are unsubstantiated and why many victims don’t bother complaining at all.

‘It’s time to mobilise,’ he says. ‘It’s time to start to write to your local members. It’s time to barrage the Premier, the Police Minister, [and] the Attorney General on social media, on their email, on snail mail. They need to know that, in fact, what is happening is not acceptable.’

Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service
Listen to ‘It’s Time to Mobilise.’ Standing Up for Indigenous Victorians on The Rap19:5423 January 2019